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Paul Quinlan

Regional Advisor

Trees That Count Te Rahi O Tāne

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Plenary Speaker

Thurs 3 Nov

3:45 – 4:30

Multi-purpose native forestry – an opportunity for arborists?

BIO

Paul is the Northland Regional Advisor for Trees That Count. He has over 25 years’ experience as a landscape architect and has particular expertise in indigenous forestry – from planting and silviculture, right through to sustainable management and harvesting of regenerating tōtara on farmland. He also coordinates the Northland Tōtara Working Group, and is a trustee of Tāne’s Tree Trust, managing several research projects on native forestry with tōtara. Presently he is writing a free to use Practical Guide to Managing Tōtara on Private Land – with the first chapters on pruning and thinning, along with a video on pruning tōtara available on the Tane’s Tree Trust website, here: https://www.tanestrees.org.nz/projects/a-practical-guide-to-managing-t-tara-on-private-land/

ABSTRACT

In response to climate-change and the biodiversity and freshwater crises, forests, and particularly native forests, have become more relevant than ever. Trees That Count is part of the movement to integrate more native forest into our landscapes at a significant scale. The Climate Change Commission recommends planting another 300,000 ha of native forest. Where will these new forests be, what roles will they have, and how will they be managed? Native forests have multiple values and can be well-suited to multi-purpose management. Many of these new native forests seek to combine environmental enhancement, recreational uses, aesthetic values and, in some places, also some productive management too (including silviculture and low-impact selective harvests). This is a new blend of forestry and ecology. Developing and tending such forests will require an understanding of forest dynamics, structure, and tree health. It will also require the flexible application of a range of principles, and very skillful tree-work at a micro-spatial and individual tree level. Is this an opportunity for arborists?